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The 400km of ‘Underground’ (most of the Tube is actually above ground) railways in London features some 40 ‘lost’ stations. Abandoned usually because they were built by rival companies and were no longer viable after mergers – they can often be seen from passing trains. However, a few remain visible above ground. For more, see www.abandonedstations.org.uk

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Lost Stations

Brompton Road

Brompton Road opened in 1906 and closed in 1934, being too close to Knightsbridge and South Kensington stations, It was part of the Great Northern, Piccadilly & Brompton Railway (GNP&BR). During the Blitz of WWII, it was the Royal Artillery’s anti-aircraft control centre for London.

Cottage Place SW3
Tube: Knightstbridge

Hyde Park Corner

Not lost as such, but converted into Pizza On The Park, this part of Hyde Park Corner station fell out of use on conversion from lifts to escalators, when new entrances had to be built for several stations. (There is a similar disused entrance at Euston.) The first escalator was at Earls Court in 1911.

11 Knightsbridge SW1
Tube: Hyde Park Corner

Strand (Aldwych)

Closed in 1994, when the lifts became uneconomic to fix, this station first opened in 1907. It was soon renamed Aldywich as Charing Cross was then also known as Strand. Very popular with film-makers, it has featured in Patriot Games and the All Saints’ Honest, as well as various pop videos.

Strand WC2
Tube: Charing Cross

Down Street

Opened in 1907, Down Street was never busy, being too close to Hyde Park Corner and Dover Street (later renamed Green Park) stations. It was closed in 1932, though it served as a deep level shelter during World War II (with prime minister Winston Churchill being a frequent visitor).

Down Street W1
Tube: Green Park

Mark Lane

Now an All Bar One, the last remnant underground of Mark Lane is a pedestrian subway to the Tower of London. Opened in 1884, it was renamed Tower Hill in 1946 and then replaced by the current station in 1967 when this site proved impossible to expand to cope with a growing number of users.

Tower Hill EC3
Tube: Tower Hill

Kingsway Tram subway

This subway was the first built in London to help ease traffic congestion. It took the LCC (London County Council) electric trams down to the Embankment and on to Waterloo Bridge. A large part of the subway is now used by cars while another section is being turned into a night club.

Southampton Row WC1
Tube: Holborn

www.tramway.co.uk

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